BEFORE YOU CONSIDER ADOPTING A DOODLE...

...or ANY dog for that matter, it is critical that you first develop a complete understanding of the "breed" or combination of breeds associated with any particular dog that you have in mind. Researching information will only serve to educate and prepare you to make an appropriate decision when it comes to selecting the dog that will ultimately be part of your family for the duration of that dogs life.

 

WHAT IS A "DOODLE"?

 

A "doodle" is a Poodle hybrid or crossbreed dog with ancestry in the purebred poodle and a dog of another purebred dog breed. A doodle is sometimes referred to as a "designer dog."



DOODLES COME IN ALL SIZES, COLORS AND COAT TYPES


The term "designer dog" was first used in the late 20th century, when breeders began to cross purebred poodles with other recognized dog breeds in order to create a dog with the non-shedding, allergy-friendly coat of the Poodle, combined with various desirable characteristics from other breeds.

 

A Labradoodle is a crossbreed or "hybrid" dog created by crossing the Labrador Retriever and the Standard or Miniature Poodle.

CLICK TO SEE "DOGS 101 THE LABRADOODLE"

PARENT BREEDS

THE STANDARD POODLE

AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB POODLE BREED STANDARD

THE LABRADOR RETRIEVER

AMERICAN KENNEL CLUB LABRADOR RETRIEVER BREED STANDARD


PHOTO COURTESY OF APRIL CLIBER & CLIBERDOODLE



A Goldendoodle is a Golden Retriever and Poodle cross.

CLICK TO SEE "DOGS 101" GOLDENDOODLE

 



Unlike the Labradoodle, the Goldendoodle is an American phenomenon first bred in the US in the mid 1990's. Most Goldendoodles are a first generation cross,( F1) or are backcrossed by breeding an F1 Goldendoodle with a Poodle (F1B). A few breeders are breeding second generation (F2) Goldendoodles which are the product of a Goldendoodle crossed with another Goldendoodle.

NORTH AMERICAN RETRIEVERS OR "DOUBLE DOODLES"



A North American Retriever or "Double Doodle" is a combination of a Goldendoodle (Golden Retriever/ Poodle) crossed with a Labradoodle (Labrador Retriever/Poodle) also first bred in the US within the last few years.These dogs were first bred and named by Jane Stanger of Lincoln Manor Labradoodles.

The reason for breeding the Double Doodle was to create not only a beautiful, allergy friendly pet, but an intelligent dog with a calm disposition, and an eager to learn and serve attitude. 

 

Many breeders are breeding Labradoodle to Labradoodle over successive generations, and trying to establish a new dog breed. This practice began with one man in Australia and the resulting dogs are usually referred to as Multigenerational (Multigen) or Australian Labradoodles.

Australian Labradoodles also differ from early generation and Multigenerational Labradoodles in that they may also have other breeds in their ancestry. English and American Cocker Spaniel/Poodle crosses (cockapoos), Irish Water Spaniels and Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers were used in some Australian Labradoodle lines. Curly Coated Retrievers were used too, but these lines were discontinued.

Some breeders prefer to restrict breeding to early generation dogs (bred from a Poodles and Labradors rather than from two Labradoodles) to maximize genetic diversity and maintain hybid vigor as a way to avoid the inherited health problems that plague many recognized dog breeds.


The Labradoodle was first deliberately bred in 1988, when Australian breeder Wally Conron first crossed the Labrador Retriever and Standard Poodle for Royal Guide Dogs of Melbourne Australia. His goal was to combine the low-shedding coat of the Poodle with the gentleness and train-ability of the Labrador ultimately providing a Guide/Service Dog suitable for people with allergies to fur and dander.

EARLY LABRADOODLE GUIDE DOGS


FOOTNOTE: Wally Conran has recently openly expressed his regret for being the founder of what has now become a fashionable trend. His regret is based on the now huge numbers of irresponsible breeders crossing every breed imaginable with poodles without any consideration of the health and well being of carrying mothers, pups and future doodle generations. He also regrets that this has now become a very lucrative back yard industry.


SEE "MY STORY-I DESIGNED A DOG"

BY WALLY CONRON


http://doodlerescueinc.ning.com/group/isadoodleforyou/forum/topics/...

Throughout those early years Kate Shoeffel, a vet in NSW Australia began breeding first generation (F1) Labradoodles from Labrador and Poodle matings. Her F1's were amongst the first Labradoodles to be exported from Australia to America.

Because of their immense rise in popularity, people began crossing any Labrador with any poodle without any regard to genetics, bloodline, or temperament and calling the puppies "Labradoodles.” The result was an unpredictable variety of puppies with various physical characteristics. The evident need for breeders to develop a standard for this fascinating dog gave rise to the establishment of two Breeding and Research Centers for Labradoodles in Australia.

In 1989, Rutland Manor Labradoodle Breeding and Research Center was organized in Darnum, Victoria by Beverley Manners and her daughter Angela Wetzel Cunningham. Ms. Cunningham simultaneously organized The Tegan Park Labradoodle Breeding and Research Centre located in Seaspray, Victoria.

BEVERLEY MANNERS


SEE "THE ART OF DEVELOPING A BREED" BY BEVERLEY MANNERS
http://www.alpsdoodles.org/pages/Beverley_breedhist.htm

In 1998, Tegan Park introduced the "Miniature" Labradoodle to the public. When these were crossed with the standard Labradoodle, the medium Labradoodle resulted. Thus three sizes are currently distinguished.

What ensued was a remarkable yet somewhat misleading marketing campaign that took the world, particularly the United States by storm inducing "Doodle Fever" in the masses. Thanks to the skillful use of PR combined with the fact that doodles happen to truly be wonderful canine companions regardless of their coat types, the demand for these dogs increased dramatically and virtually overnight. Suddenly everyone and anyone who could get their hands on a Standard Poodle and Lab breeding pair, went into the doodle breeding business.

In 2008 Ms. Manners of Rutland Manor and her daughter Ms. Cunningham of Tegan Park had a nasty and very public "parting of ways". Cunningham's bitter divorce and the dissolving of mutual assets acquired during the marriage, resulted in Tegan Park USA doodles and foundation breeding stock dogs worth millions left in deplorable conditions on the Cunningham's Florida ranch. Many dog's were "auctioned" off on the internet...Many were filtered through the shelter system.... Many who were sick and suffering from various ailments including Parvo virus and malnutrition died.

SEE LINKS BELOW ON TEGAN PARK AND ANGELA WETZEL CUNNINGHAM

http://disc.yourwebapps.com/discussion.cgi?disc=234742;article=272;

http://www.labradoodle.org.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=8468

Ms. Manners herself has been accused of running a "puppy mill" operation and has been under investigation by the RSPCA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) since 2008.

SEE "STOP RUTLAND MANOR" & "THE TRUTH ABOUT RUTLAND MANOR" BELOW
http://stoprutlandmanor.wordpress.com/2009/10/08/a-word-from-michae...

http://www.govegan.com.au/puppies/?p=145


To help you understand the generation and breeding terminology we have provided the following glossary, explanations and examples.

WHAT THE "F" MEANS

F denotes the word "Filial" \ˈfi-lē-əl, ˈfil-yəl\

   1 : of or relating to a son or daughter

   2 :  having or assuming the relation of a child or offspring

FILIAL  GENERATION

The offspring of a genetically specified mating: first filial generation (symbol F1), the offspring of parents of contrasting genotypes; second filial generation (F2), the offspring of two F1 individuals; third filial generation (F3), fourth filial generation (F4), etc., the offspring in succeeding generation's of continued inbreeding of F1 descendents.

F1B, F2B, F3B etc........ B=BACKCROSS

This denotes when a litter has been backcrossed to one of the parent breeds. Backcrossing to a poodle is generally done to improve coat type and increase the possibility of a curlier coat. It is therefore not common practice for breeders to backcross to a Labrador.




EXAMPLE OF AN F1 & F1B LABRADOODLE

(L-R )  F1 - (chocolate) - FIRST GENERATION - LAB TO POODLE (50% Lab / 50% Poodle )

F1B - (creme) - DOODLE BRED BACK (B=BACKCROSS) TO A POODLE- (25% Lab/75% Poodle)



EXAMPLES OF LABRADOODLE GENERATION VARIATIONS


F1

F1 = 1st generation puppy - 50% purebred-A and 50% purebred-B - for example, a Labrador to Poodle cross, this is first generation, resulting in healthier offspring. In this particular Labradoodle cross hair type can be smooth like a Labrador, fleece/wooly like a Poodle.



F1B

F1B = backcross puppy - 25% purebred-A and 75% purebred-B. For example, an F1 Labradoodle and Poodle cross; this is Labradoodle bred back to Poodle.

F2



F2 = second generation puppy - F1 hybrid crossed with an F1 hybrid - for example, an F1 Labradoodle crossed with an F1 Labradoodle. This combination you get the same percentage of purebred-A as purebred-B as you would an F1 hybrid.



F2B



F2B= second generation back-cross puppy = F1 bred to a F1b (hybrid back-cross)



F3

F3 = F2 hybrid to F2 hybrid


Multi-generation or "Multi-gen"



Multi-gen = F3 or higher generation hybrid crossed with F3 or higher generation hybrid


EXAMPLE: F2B MINIATURE LABRADOODLES

 


Doodles have many different coat types, colors and come in different sizes.



ALAA LABRADOODLE TRAITS AND STANDARDS



GENERAL APPEARANCE

 

Should be athletic and graceful, yet compact with substance and medium boning with a free flowing wavy or curling coat that does not shed. Joyful and energetic when free, soft and quiet when handled. They should approach people in a happy friendly manner with eye-to-eye contact, keen to learn and easy to train.

LABRADOODLE SIZE



Standard

21 to 24 (not over 25) inches (or about 53-63 cm) from the wither to ground measurement.

The ideal size for the female is 21-23 inches and the male is 22-24 inches.

Weight range tends toward 23-30 kg (about 50-65 lbs).

Oversize is a major fault.

Medium

17 to 20 (not over 21) inches (or about 43-52 cm) from the wither to ground measurement.

The ideal size for the female is 17-19 inches and the male is 18-20 inches.

Weight range tends toward 13-20 kg or (about 30-45 lbs).

Miniature

14 to 16 (not over 17) inches (or about 35-42 cm) from the wither to ground measurement.

There is no correlation between height and sex in the Miniature size.

Weight range tends toward 7-12 kg or (about 15-25 lbs).

Undersize is a Major fault.

BODY

 



Height (to wither) as to length (from sternum to point of buttock) should appear square and compact. Shoulders should be at a good angle with firm elbows held close to the rib cage. Upright shoulders is a fault. Hindquarters should be of medium angulation with short strong hocks. Top line should remain level with strong loin and level croup. They are a galloping dog therefore flanks should rise up from a brisket set just below the elbows, but should not be excessively deep. Ribs should be well sprung but not barreled. Overall they should appear square, balanced, athletic with good muscling.

MOVEMENT

 



When trotting should be purposeful, strong and elastic with good reach and drive, giving the appearance of "going somewhere". When relaxed, happy or at play they will prance and skim the ground lightly. Excessive tightness in the hip will produce a stilted action and is considered a fault. Top line should remain level with strong loin and croup.

Tail
Is relatively high and is preferred to be carried saber. It is allowed to be carried below the top line or gaily above. Tightly curled possum type or teapot tails are undesirable and a fault.

Neck
Firm well muscled neck should be moderately long, slightly arched and flow into well angled shoulders with no appearance of abruptness. The neck should not be coarse or stumpy and should lend an air of elegance to the dog. A short or thick neck is a fault.

Head
Sculptured, Broad, well-defined eyebrows, medium stop, eyes set well apart. Fore-face shorter than skull. The head should be clean and chiseled, and fully coated as on the body, legs and tail. A long, narrow or blockhead is a fault.

Ears
Set moderately flat against head and should be level with eye. Leather should be of medium thickness, when gently drawn forward should reach the top canine tooth. Ear leather reaching beyond the tip of the nose is considered a server fault. Ear canal should be free of excessive hair and not thick or bulbous. When inquisitive or alert the ear should rise to the top of the head. Thick, heavy ear leather is a fault.

Eyes
Slightly round, large and expressive, always offering eye-to-eye contact when engaged in activity with humans. Protruding or sunken eyes are a fault. Watery or tearful eyes are a fault. Wide round or narrow almond shape is considered a fault.

Teeth
Scissor bite. Undershot or overshot bite is a major fault. Crowding teeth in miniatures is a fault.

Nose
Large, square, and fleshy.

COAT

Labradoodle coats are generally divided into 3 categories: Hair, Fleece and Wool. These 3 categories are also broken down further into subcategories. See below for a complete guide.

HAIR COAT-or Hair (which can be curly, straight or wavy, but is more similar in texture to a Labrador's coat).

 




FLEECE COAT-Fleece (soft and free-flowing, with a kinked or wavy appearance);

 




WOOL COAT-Wool (with tight curls, and similar in appearance to that of a Poodle, but with a softer texture);



There are three coat wave "levels"
Curly, the strands loop over themselves in a curl about 1 inch in diameter
Wavy, the strand waves and wiggles back and forth not looping over
Straight, this can be long to about 5 inches or a short 2 inches in length

 
EXAMPLE: VARIATIONS OF FLEECE AND WOOL COATS

 


Length should be 4-6 inches long. It should be straight, wavy or forming spirals and should naturally grow in staples with a soft texture. It should not be too thick or dense nor should it be fluffy or fuzzy. It should be a single coat, any sign of a double coat is a fault. The ideal Fleece and Wool coats can be spun successfully. Hair coat [Hair texture that sheds] is undesirable and is a major fault.

It is important that the coat gives the impression of being "fleece" in type rather than dog hair.

FLEECE COAT

 

Texture should be light and silky similar to the texture of the Angora Goat. Appearing to contain a silky lanolin in texture. Appearance can range from an almost straight loosely waved to an obviously waved coat, Kemp is often found around eyes and along the top line. The absence of Kemp is highly prized.will need to be brushed/combed thoroughly about every two-three weeks. This coat usually requires trimming one-two times a year.

WOOL COAT

 

Texture is denser than that of the Fleece with a similar texture to that of Lambs Wool. Appearing to contain a sheep lanolin in texture. The ideal wool coat should hang in loose hollow spirals. It is acceptable to exhibit a spring appearance rather than spiral but a sprung wool coat is undesirable. An overly thick or dense coat is also undesirable. There should be no body odor or shedding in the Fleece and Wool coat. Has the highest rate of success of the three coat types for being allergy and asthma friendly. It will need to be brushed/combed thoroughly about once a week. This coat also requires trimming about three-four times a year.

HAIR COAT



Which both has odor and sheds in varying degrees, (usually seen in the early generation dogs). It is acceptable to see a coat change from the puppy to adult coat, and also during hormonal changes in fertile bitches.Will need a quick brushing/combing about once a month depending on the density and length of the coat. NEVER shave your hair coat's body. A light trimming might be required with scissors but usually not.

SKIN PIGMENT
Black or Rose. Pigment should be strong pink spots or patches on nose, lips, eye rims, or pads are a fault. Dogs with rose pigment should have eye rims, lips, nose and pads with rose pigment. Pink spots or patches are a severe fault. [Rose should be a rich liver colour].

EYE COLOR
Should complement and blend with the coat colour. Black, Blue, Red, Chocolate and Silver dogs must have dark brown eyes. Café, Gold, Cream, Chalk should have Hazel to Brown eyes If they have black pigment. Caramel, Lavender, Parchment and dogs with Rose pigment should have Brown or “ghost” eyes. [Ghost is a Hazel colour range much the same as it is in humans]. Flecking with different shades of Hazel with Green - Blue make this eye colour quite unique. Ghost eyes must remain soft in appearance. Cold, staring, expressionless appearance in all eye colour is a major fault.

AN EXAMPLE OF ROSE(LIVER) PIGMENT AND "GHOST EYES" (GREEN,AQUA)



COAT COLOURS-Labradoodles come in a wide variety of colours, including chocolate, cafe, parchment, cream, gold, apricot, red, black, silver, chalk, parti colours and generally all the colours that can be found in Poodles.

There are 3 groups of colors that belong to the Australian Labradoodle.

SHADED:

is the the group that have a blend of tones to make the color you see. Silver, Apricot Cream, Cafe` , Lavender, Gold , Parchment, Phantom, Agouti and Sable are included in this group.

SOLID:

is the group that are an even solid color all over. [sun bleaching is not penalized not grouped into the Shaded section] Raven [Black] Chocolate, Caramel Ice, Chalk, Red are included in this group.

PARTI:

is the group that have white on the face and or body, Pied - Patches of any above color and patches of white over the whole body. Parti- is a shaded or solid dog with white markings on the face, feet and chest, or just on the face or just on the face and feet.
THE FOLLOWING ARE EXAMPLES OF LABRADOODLE COAT COLORS

CHALK

 

This colour should be a white colour but when compared to white is rather a chalky white in colour. Nose pigment to be Black or Rose.

CREAM


This colour should be a creamy colouring sometimes with apricot/gold hinting, all shades of cream are acceptable. Nose pigment to be Black or Rose.
CREAM CARAMEL


This colour should be a creamy colouring sometimes with apricot/gold hinting, all shades of cream are acceptable. Nose pigment to be Black or Rose.

GOLD


This colour has also been referred to as “apricot” should be the colour of the inside of a ripe apricot to varying shades of rich Gold in colour. A true Gold will not have a lighter root than the outer coat and preferable have an even colouration over the entire body. This colour may fade as the dog grows older, senior dogs should not be penalized for paling of coat colour. Nose pigment to be Black in colour.
CARAMEL


This colour ranges from a rich gold through to a deep red the preferred colour is very much the same colour as its namesake "caramel" with even colouration over the entire body. Nose pigment to be Rose in colour.

RED


This colour should be a solid even rich red in colour. A true red must not be lighter at the root than the outer coat. Reds can fade as the dog grows older, senior dogs should not be penalized for paling of coat colour. Nose pigment to be Black. [Rare colour group].

BLACK


This colour should be a solid black in colour with no sprinkling of any other colour through the coat. Nose pigment to be Black.

SILVER


This colour can range in shades from very light pewter in colour to a dark charcoal in colour it is preferred to see an even colour through the coat but acceptable to see uneven layering of colour in the coat. Silvers are born Black with the coat colour developing over time (1-3 yrs). Nose pigment to be Black.

BLUE


This colour should be a dark to medium smoky blue in colour. Blues are born Black but will have a Blue/Grey skin pigment. The blue coat colour will develop over time (1-3yrs) but as a developed adult should have an even coat colour, any other colour throughout the Blue is undesirable. Nose pigment to be Blue/Grey [matching the skin pigmentation]. [Rare colour group].

CHOCOLATE


This colour should be a dark rich chocolate in colour. True chocolates are born almost black in colour and maintain the rich dark colour throughout their lifetime. Colour should be even, any other colour in the coat is undesirable. Nose pigment to be Rose in colour [matching the coat colour]. [Rare colour group].

CAFE


This colour ranges from a milk chocolate to silver-beige in colour and will develop over time (1-3yrs). Nose pigment to be Rose in colour [matching the coat colour].
LAVENDER


This colour has a definite smoky lavender chocolate colour giving an almost pink to lilac appearance. Lavender dogs are born chocolate and will develop over time (1-3yrs). Any other colour in the coat is undesirable. Nose pigment to be Rose in colour [matching the coat colour]. [Rare colour group].

PARCHMENT


This colour is a creamy beige chocolate colour reminiscent of a cup of coffee with a generous addition of milk. Parchment dogs are born milk chocolate and will develop over time (1-3yrs). From a distance adult dogs can be mistaken for a dark or smoky cream. Nose pigment to be Rose in colour. [Rare colour group].

PARTI FACTORED


The body colour must be a solid dark colour with defined markings of a second lighter colour or combination of 2 colours mixed together [Not White or Chalk] [Usually gold, red, cream or silver or a combination of two.] as follows: above each eye, on the cheek, on the throat to chest, or in a chin and chest pattern, on the feet and up the legs, and under the tail. The Second colour is permissible on the inside of the leg ,flank and chest/tummy, on the sides of the muzzle, on the underside of the ears, and should not be penalized. Markings are preferred to be clear and defined. Face markings of the second colour with the entire face coloured is highly undesirable. if the other required body markings are present. Any of the solid colours combination is acceptable excluding Chalk. Pigment and eye colour to be that of its clear colour counterpart. This color belongs to the Parti group.

SEE [Patched], Phantom, Brindle and Sable colours.

PHANTOM

 
BRINDLE


A Brindle has a pattern of dark and light striping in the fur. There are black, chocolate, red & silver brindles.

MERLE


A Merle dog has a base coat of a solid colour with patches and mottled areas of other colours.

SABLE


Chocolate, Gold, Raven or Red with rust or black ticking evenly throughout the body, Slightly darker ears acceptable. A small white flash no larger than 2.5cm in diameter can appear on the chest is permissible. Pigment and eye colour to be that of its clear colour counterpart. This color belongs to the Parti group. Belongs to the Rare color group.


AGOUTI

 

Should have an even and equal distribution of the colours with layering of black fibers in regions of lighter colours (usually, /gold/red, ) producing a tiger-striped pattern. This color belongs to the Parti group. Belongs to the Rare color group.

PIED
Any colour with white patching. White not to exceed 50% of the body. Freckling or white over the eye area is highly undesirable. No set pattern is required but symmetrical markings are highly desirable. Pigment and eye colour to be that of its clear colour counterpart. This color belongs to the Parti group.

 

This article is the authored intellectual property of:

Doodle Rescue Collective, Inc.


 

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